Improving High Cholesterol

Using Patient-Centered Team-Based Care to Improve High Cholesterol Prevention, Detection, and Management in Wisconsin


Recommendations for High Cholesterol Management in Wisconsin:  A Call for Collective Action

WNA is pleased to release our newest publication Using Patient-Centered Team-Based Care to Improve High Cholesterol Prevention, Detection, and Management in Wisconsin. This  foundational and complementary document to improve the prevention, detection, and management of high cholesterol Wisconsin using patient-centered team-based care. These recommendations are consistent with the. ACC/AHA/AACVPR/AAPA/ ABC/ACPM/ADA/AGS/APhA/ASPC/NLA/PCNA guideline on the management of blood cholesterol: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines.  You can find the link to the document below: :

Using Patient-Centered Team-Based Care to Improve High Cholesterol Prevention, Detection, and Management in Wisconsin 

Having high blood cholesterol raises the risk for heart disease, the leading cause of death, and for stroke, the fifth leading cause of death. Raised cholesterol increases the risks of heart disease and stroke. The chart below demonstrates the prevalence of high total cholesterol.

Prevalence of High Total Cholesterol* Among Adults Aged ≥20 Years,† by  Age Group and Sex —U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2015–2018 *Defined as serum total cholesterol ≥240 mg/dL.

Addressing high cholesterol in Wisconsin is important for the following reasons:

  1. Having high blood cholesterol raises the risk for heart disease, the leading cause of death, and for stroke, the fifth leading cause of death. With treatment, this can be prevented.
  2. High cholesterol has no symptoms, so many people do not know that their cholesterol is too high. A simple blood test can check cholesterol levels.
  3. Cholesterol travels through the blood on proteins called “lipoproteins.” Two types of lipoproteins carry cholesterol throughout the body: LDL (low-density lipoprotein), sometimes called “bad” cholesterol and HDL (high-density lipoprotein), or “good” cholesterol, absorbs cholesterol and carries it back to the liver. The liver then flushes it from the body.
  4. 95 million U.S. adults age 20 or older total cholesterol levels levels higher than 200 mg/dL. Nearly 29 million adult Americans have total cholesterol levels higher than 240 mg/dL.
  5. The age-standardized prevalence of self-reported high total cholesterol in WI is 29.9-31.7%.   https://www.cdc.gov/cholesterol/facts.htm
  6. Health care providers have an opportunity to improve upon the identification, treatment and management through patient education and engagement.

Recommendations Highlights:

  • Call to Wisconsin health systems and inter-professional patient health care teams to improve in high cholesterol prevention and control using patient-centered team-based care approaches. Nearly 90% of adults have a usual source of health care and insurance..
  • Call to local health departments and community organizations to provide population health leadership and continue to work toward the development of durable partnerships and linkages with health  systems.
  • Practical because the recommendations were developed by experienced frontline clinicians who possess an expert understanding of both health care systems and patient care.
  • Practical because they can be implemented in part or whole, gradually or immediately.
  • We strive for system-wide collaboration and stronger partnerships to improve patient health and safety and improve population health outcomes. Please assist the Wisconsin Nurses Association by sharing these documents within your organization, with your partners, and in your networks.

For more information, questions, or to champion these concepts and recommendations please contact;

Gina Dennik-Champion, RN, MSN, MSHA

Project Director, Chronic Disease Prevention Grant

Executive Director, Wisconsin Nurses Association

(608) 221-0383

info@wisconsinnurse.wpengine.com